large audience of 189 people logged onto Zoom to hear Dr. Howard Silverboard, Pulmonologist and Critical Care Physician at Northside Hospital anTony Levitas, a COVID-19 survivor, share their experiences on the frontlines of the pandemic. Sponsored by the Maimonides Society, Federation’s network for medical professionals, this was the first in a series of upcoming programs that will look at how people in our community are responding to urgent needs now. If you missed it, watch the video here

Next in the series, Thursday, May 7, from 45 pm, Jenny Levison, owner of Souper Jenny, and Jean Millkey, Manager of the JF&CS Kosher Food Pantry, will share how they are helping meet the demand for food. Register and join this Zoom conversation to learn how Jenny and Jean are working to make a difference during this crisis and how nonprofits and businesses can partner to meet the challenge. Register for their talk here to receive a link to the Zoom call. 

If you missed Dr. Silverboard and Tony Levitas in conversation, watch the video here

On the Maimonides Society call, Dr. Silverboard described his mounting fear as COVID-19 was gaining strength in Italy and threatened to overwhelm the U.S. healthcare system. By March 15 it was clear that a surge was coming, and Atlanta began to prepare for COVID-19 patients,” he said. Disaster management is something critical care doctors are trained for but most of us had never truly experienced it. It’s been harrowing to treat patients while wearing gas masks under strict protective protocols. There’s a routine for staying safe now, and I am less concerned about bringing the disease home, but ware learning as we go. Thankfully, we are not in a situation like New York City.

Tony Levitas, a psychologist and musician, is the father of two children. He was admitted to Northside Hospital on March 17, was on a ventilator for 18 days, and was not discharged until April 13. Tony is slowly gaining strength and recuperating at home. His doctors have told him that he had received medication at “veterinary levels” while in the hospital, and it clearly saved his life.